All nations and states have standards for linking vehicle identification numbers to license plate numbers. There are very few examples as old, tested and robust as this strategy. FAR 52.245-1(f)(1)(ii), DFARS 252.245-7001(b) and NFS 1852.245–74(c)(2) are thin on specifics.

The UII married to the UIN

A vehicle identification number (VIN) is a kind of serial number. A serial number is also called a unique item identifier (UII). Now, think of the licence plate as a kind of asset tag. An asset tag is also called unique identification number (UIN). Linked together, these strategies constitute a uniform identification system (UIS) for marking personal property.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_registration_plates_of_Mexico

UINs are supposed to be unique.

When it comes to government regulations, there is little to describe the importance of a unique identification number (UIN). FAR 52.245-1(f)(1)(ii)  and DFARS 252.245-7001(b) talk about “tagging” and “marking” items, but with what kind of identifier?

NFS 1852.245–74(c)(2) says you must use a human readable “Unique Identification Number (License Tag),” but doesn’t say anything about what constitutes such an identification number.
https://mypropertyidregistry.com/2019/11/07/uii-is-not-a-uin

Establishing new standards

Virtually every large institution uses asset tags on their property. Here is one provider and their client list.
https://www.sunflowersystems.com/customers.html

The concern is for smaller companies that can’t afford large-scale systems. For these organizations, it’s not clear what a uniform identification system (UIS) is, or what a unique identification number (UIN) should look like.
https://mypropertyidregistry.com/2019/09/20/custody-custody-custody/